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CFO Insights — Chapter II: Preparing for life after being CFO

Published on: Oct 04, 2018

Inevitably, the time comes when — as a sitting CFO — you will likely ask yourself, what’s next? And, if you are of a certain age, the answer may be retirement or at least semi-retirement. The question then becomes, what will the next chapter of my life look like?

It’s a question many CFOs seem to be asking themselves lately. In 2017, for example, 98 of the Fortune 1000 CFOs rotated out of their roles, according to statistics provided by Heidrick & Struggles, noting an average retirement age of 61.58. Since the beginning of 2018, that number has risen to 107 of the Fortune 1000 CFOs, with an average retirement age of 60.11. Little wonder then, that many CFOs are starting to lay the groundwork for life beyond being a finance chief.

Truthfully, an abundance of choices likely awaits CFOs who step down — with no one-size-fits-all answer. Armed with their generous salaries and benefits, many do not worry about living comfortably, and can instead focus on finding new sources of fulfillment. Others want to stay engaged, though maybe not at the same pace.

And in this issue of CFO Insights, we will look at how some CFOs have made the move into retirement, weighed their options, and found gratification outside of the C-suite.

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