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News

ASBJ (Accounting Standards Board of Japan) Image
FASB (US Financial Accounting Standards Board) (lt blue) Image

FASB and ASBJ hold biannual meeting

08 Feb 2019

On 7 and 8 February, the FASB and the Accounting Standards Board of Japan (ASBJ) met in Tokyo. The meeting was the 25th in a series of biannual meetings between the two standard-setters.

In addition to giving updates on their respective standard-setting activities at the meeting, the two boards exchanged views on technical topics in which they both have an interest, including business combinations and goodwill, performance reporting and disclosures, leases, and the distinction between liabilities and equity.

The next meeting between the FASB and ASBJ is expected to be held in the Second half of 2019 in Norwalk. For more information about the latest meeting, see the press release on the ASBJ website.

IASB meeting (blue) Image

IASB decides on further potential amendments to IFRS 17

07 Feb 2019

At its meeting currently held in London, the IASB discussed IFRS 17 'Insurance Contracts' and 4 of the 25 concerns regarding the standard that were identified in October 2018 as candidates for potential amendments.

Applying the criteria for evaluating proposed amendments agreed on in October 2018, the Board came to the following conclusions:

Issue identified at the October IASB meeting

Agenda paper with detailed description (link to IASB website)

Staff recommendation

Board decision

1 — Loans that transfer significant insurance risk

Agenda paper 2A

  1. To amend the scope of IFRS 17 and IFRS 9 for insurance contracts for which the only insurance in the contract is for the settlement of some or all of the obligation created by the contract to enable an entity to apply either IFRS 17 or IFRS 9 to such contracts

13/14 support staff recommendation (on portfolio basis)

23 — Transition: Optionality and comparative information

Agenda paper 2B

  1. To retain the IFRS 17 transition requirements without amendment that would reduce the optionality
  2. To retain the IFRS 17 requirement to present restated comparative information

14/14 support both staff recommendations

25 (and some aspects of 8) — Transition: Risk mitigation option and amounts accumulated in other comprehensive income on transition

Agenda paper 2C

  1. To retain the requirements in IFRS 17 relating to the prohibition of retrospective application of the risk mitigation option
  2. To retain the requirements in IFRS 17 with respect to the cumulative amounts included in other comprehensive income

13/14 support staff recommendation 1 (the staff will do further research and bring back the issue at a future meeting); 14/14 support staff recommendation 2

24 — Transition: Modified retrospective approach

Agenda paper 2D

  1. To retain the requirements in IFRS 17 that an entity:
    • (a) cannot use a specified modification in the modified retrospective approach to the extent that the entity has reasonable and supportable information to apply the related IFRS 17 requirement retrospectively
    • (b) can only use a specified modification in the modified retrospective approach when the entity has reasonable and supportable information to apply that modification
  2. To
    • (a) not amend IFRS 17 to permit an entity to develop its own modifications
    • (b) amend the transition requirements in IFRS 17 for a liability that relates to the settlement of claims incurred before an insurance contract was acquired as follows:
      • (i) to add a specified modification to the modified retrospective approach to require an entity to classify such liabilities as a liability for incurred claims
      • (ii) to permit an entity applying the fair value approach to choose to classify such liabilities as a liability for incurred claims
    • (c) not amend the specified modification in the modified retrospective approach related to the use of cash flows that are known to have occurred
    • (d) not amend IFRS 17 to permit an entity to apply the specified modifications related to groups of insurance contracts without direct participation features to determine the contractual service margin for groups of contracts with direct participating features

14/14 support both staff recommendations (additional guidance to be included)

Please click to access our full meeting notes from the session.

The staff notes that the only outstanding topics are now the level of aggregation of insurance contracts and a question about a risk mitigation option for general model contracts related to the December 2018 Board discussion on risk mitigation. The staff intend to present papers on the remaining topics and on possible sweep issues at the March 2019 Board meeting.

In addition, the IASB has issued a podcast, featuring IASB member Darrel Scott and Technical Staff Laura Kennedy, on the IFRS 17 discussion at the February IASB meeting.

FRC (United Kingdom Financial Reporting Council) Image

FRC consults on the reporting of intangibles

06 Feb 2019

The UK Financial Reporting Council (FRC) has launched a consultation into possible improvements to the reporting of factors that are important to a business’ generation of value.

The FRC notes that there are frequent calls to reform the accounting for intangible assets, partly in response to the move to a knowledge-based economy. Therefore, the FRC paper published today considers the case for radical change to the accounting for intangible assets and the likelihood of such change being made in the near future.

It suggests that:

  • relevant and useful information could be provided without the need to recognise more intangible assets in companies’ balance sheets;
  • such information could cover a range of factors, broader than the definition of intangible assets in accounting standards, that are relevant to the generation of value;
  • improvements could be made on a voluntary basis within current reporting frameworks (such as the strategic report); and
  • participants in the reporting supply chain could collaborate to bring about improvements.

The paper is structured into five sections:

  • Section 1 introduces the subject and notes the objectives of the paper.
  • Section 2 discusses the implications of the IASB's Conceptual Framework for the reporting of intangibles. It relates its conclusions to the economic features of intangibles that are identified in the literature.
  • Section 3 considers possible improvements to the reporting of expenses incurred to develop intangibles that cannot be capitalised in financial statements but are expected to benefit future periods.
  • Section 4 discusses how narrative reporting, including the use of metrics, might be used to provide better information for investors on intangibles.
  • Section 5 notes that further consideration is required of the implementation of the suggestions made in the paper and the role of preparers, investors, and standard-setters in that process.

Please click to access the consultation paper on the FRC website. Comments are requested by 30 April 2019.

Accountancy Europe Image
European Union Image

Accountancy Europe responds to EC expert group report on disclosure of climate-related information

06 Feb 2019

Accountancy Europe has responded to the report on companies' disclosure of climate-related information issued by the Technical Expert Group on Sustainable Finance set up by the European Commission (EC). While the response notes that the initiative brings a great opportunity to link financial and non-financial information, improving integration of corporate reporting, Accountancy Europe also voices some concerns.

The response to the report stresses that it is important to clarify the two directions of impacts: the Non-Financial Reporting Directive (NFRD) addresses the impact of the company’s activities on the environment and the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) the physical impact of the environment on the company. Accountancy Europe notes that the report is not entirely clear which approach is applied in which instance.

The response also notes that while the concept of materiality is an element of both the TCFD and the NFRD, they may be seen as differing in their interpretation. Accountancy Europe suggests clarifying both concepts and how they can be aligned to each other - which will also help to avoid boilerplate disclosures.

While the Accountancy Europe response expresses understanding for the urgency to focus firstly on climate change related issues, it also stresses the importance of addressing social aspects. Climate-related matters should not be treated in isolation as this could have a negative impact elsewhere.

Finally, the response notes that more and more stakeholders including investors want to know whether or not they can trust reported information by companies and therefore ask for independent assurance over the reported information. Therefore, Accountancy Europe believes that it may be necessary to discuss assurance over non-financial information.

Please click to download the full response from the Accountancy Europe website.

IFRS Foundation (blue) Image

2019 required and annotated required IFRS Standards now available

04 Feb 2019

The IFRS Foundation announces that the annual publication formerly known as the 'Blue Book' is now available.

The IFRS Standards Required 1 January 2019 pub­li­ca­tion contains all official pro­nounce­ments that are mandatory on 1 January 2019. It does not include IFRSs with an effective date after 1 January 2019. The Annotated IFRS Standards Required 2019 includes the same content as IFRS Standards Required 1 January 2019 but with ad­di­tional an­no­ta­tions containing extensive cross-references, explanatory notes and IFRS Interpretations Committee agenda decisions.

In addition, the IFRS Foundation has released a video describing the differences in the four volumes it publishes each year.

For more information, see the press release on the IASB’s website.

IFRS for SMEs (mid blue) Image

Additional educational module on the IFRS for SMEs on leases

04 Feb 2019

The IFRS Foundation has issued an additional new stand-alone educational module, which supports the learning, application, and reading of financial statements prepared with the IFRS for SMEs Standard.

The module focuses on the accounting of leases applying Section 20 Leases of the IFRS for SMEs.

Please click to access all 33 IFRS for SMEs modules available so far (free registration required).

IPSASB (International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board) (mid gray) Image

IPSASB publishes final guidance on accounting for social benefits and exposure draft on collective and individual services and emergency relief

01 Feb 2019

The International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB) has released International Public Sector Accounting Standard (IPSAS) 42 'Social Benefits' and an related Exposure Draft (ED) 67 'Collective and Individual Services and Emergency Relief (Amendments to IPSAS 19)' to address a wide range of significant government expenditures.

IPSAS 42 Social Benefits provides guidance on accounting for social benefits expenditure. It defines social benefits as cash transfers paid to specific individuals and/or households to mitigate the effect of social risk. The standard requires an entity to recognise an expense and a liability for the next social benefit payment. IPSAS 42 establishes principles and requirements for:

  • Recognising expenses and liabilities for social benefits;
  • Measuring expenses and liabilities for social benefits;
  • Presenting information about social benefits in the financial statements; and
  • Determining what information to disclose to enable users of the financial statements to evaluate the nature and financial effects of the social benefits provided by the reporting entity.

In order to extend IPSASB’s guidance to public services as well as cash transfers, ED 67 Collective and Individual Services and Emergency Relief proposes new requirements for accounting for collective services (such as defense at national-levels), individual services (such as healthcare) and emergency relief. For collective and individual services, ED 67 proposes that an expense is recognised at the point of service delivery. ED 67 also proposes that an expense and liability is recognised for some emergency relief, but not where emergency relief is delivered as an ongoing activity of government. The IPSASB notes that the distinction between social benefits and collective and individual services is important, but the accounting treatment of these transactions should be conceptually consistent. Comments on the ED are requested by 31 May 2019.

The following additional information is available on the IPSASB website:

IPSASB (International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board) (mid gray) Image

IPSASB issues amendments to keep IPSASs in line with IFRSs

31 Jan 2019

The International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB) has released 'Long-term Interests in Associates and Joint Ventures (Amendments to IPSAS 36) and Prepayment Features with Negative Compensation (Amendments to IPSAS 41)'.

The amendments to IPSAS 36 converge IPSASs with the narrow-scope amendments to IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures made by the IASB in Long-term Interests in Associates and Joint Ventures (Amendments to IAS 28) issued October 2017.

The amendments to IPSAS 41 converge IPSASs with the narrow-scope amendments to IFRS 9 Financial Instruments made by the IASB in Prepayment Features with Negative Compensation (Amendments to IFRS 9) also issued October 2017.

Please click to access the amendments on the IPSASB website.

Leaf - sustainability (green) Image

Recent sustainability reporting developments

31 Jan 2019

A summary of recent developments at WEF, the University of Oxford, NCFA,SSE, and SASB.

The World Economic Forum (WEF) has published a White Paper Seeking Return on ESG: Advancing the Reporting Ecosystem to Unlock Impact for Business and Society, uncovering opportunities for collective action between the complex and diverse set of stakeholder groups that influence ESG reporting, and highlighting where greater action is needed to accelerate system-level progress. Please click to download the paper from the WEF website.

In December, the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, offered a debate on "Should FASB and IASB be responsible for setting standards for nonfinancial information?". A recording of the debate is available on YouTube.

The Natural Capital Finance Alliance (NCFA) has launched the world’s first step-by-step guide to help financial institutions conduct a rapid natural capital risk assessment. Please click to access the guide on the UNEP FI website.

The United Nation's Sustainable Stock Exchanges (SSE) initiative notes the following developments:

  • The Botswana Stock Exchange has published guidance for its listed companies on reporting ESG information to investors (press release).
  • The Budapest Stock Exchange has become an SSE Partner Exchange (press release).
  • The Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange has become an SSE Partner Exchange (press release).

The US Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) has appointed former FASB member Marc A. Siegel as a Board member of the SASB. Please see the press release on the SASB website for more information.

IFRS for SMEs (mid blue) Image

Additional IFRS for SMEs educational modules on intangible assets other than goodwill and on business combinations and goodwill

31 Jan 2019

The IFRS Foundation has issued two new stand-alone educational modules, which support the learning, application, and reading of financial statements prepared with the IFRS for SMEs.

The modules focus on the requirements for accounting and reporting of intangible assets other than goodwill and of business combinations and goodwill applying the following sections of the IFRS for SMEs:

  • Section 18 Intangible Assets other than Goodwill
  • Section 29 Business Combinations and Goodwill

Please click to access all 32 IFRS for SMEs modules available so far (free registration required).

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