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News

IFRIC (International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee) (blue) Image

Updated summary of issues not added to IFRIC agenda

13 Mar 2007

We have updated our Summary of Issues Not Added to IFRIC's Agenda.

bv2007.gif Image

2007 IFRS Bound Volume is published

13 Mar 2007

The International Accounting Standards Board has published the 2007 Bound Volume of International Financial Reporting Standards.

This bound volume includes all IFRSs, International Accounting Standards (IASs), IFRIC and SIC Interpretations, and IASB-issued supporting documents, including application guidance, illustrative examples, implementation guidance, bases for conclusions, and dissenting opinions approved at 1 January 2007. IFRS Bound Volume 2007 (English, ISBN: 978-1-905590-26-1) may be ordered from The IASB Website. The price is £60 plus shipping. Discounts apply to low and middle income countries and orders for more than 10 copies. Translations into other languages will be published soon. Press Release  (PDF 42k).

The main changes from the 2006 Bound Volume are the inclusion of:

  • IFRS 8 Operating Segments
  • Four new Interpretations:
    • IFRIC 9 Reassessment of Embedded Derivatives
    • IFRIC 10 Interim Financial Reporting and Impairment
    • IFRIC 11 IFRS 2–Group and Treasury Share Transactions
    • IFRIC 12 Service Concession Arrangements
  • Amendments to other IFRSs resulting from these pronouncements
  • The Due Process Handbook for the IASB, which was published in April 2006
  • A brief history of each pronouncement, which has been added to its title page
EFRAG (European Financial Reporting Advisory Group) (dk green) Image

EFRAG decides to support IFRIC 12

12 Mar 2007

The European Financial Reporting Advisory Group, whose members hold sharply divided views on IFRIC 12 Service Concession Arrangements (see our news story of 13 February 2007), has concluded, after lengthy debate at a special meeting on 9 March 2007, to issue a positive endorsement advice letter.

SEC (old) Image

SEC concern about 'IFRSs as adopted in...'

11 Mar 2007

In an address in London last week titled SEC Regulation Outside the United States, US SEC Commissioner Roel C Campos expressed concern about jurisdictions adopting their own versions of IFRSs and about how few foreign SEC registrants actually refer to conformity with IFRSs as promulgated by the IASB.

An excerpt:

I must, however, focus on one curious aspect of the roadmap in practice, which is the lack of foreign private issuers filing audited financial statements with the SEC that either use or are compliant with IFRS in the manner in which it is issued by the IASB. We had expected to see approximately 300 or so companies file their 2005 financial statements prepared using IFRS. Instead, we received only about 40 filings – hardly a critical mass. This fact is perplexing, given that the early goal is – to quote the roadmap itself – 'to see convergence in action.' So, the question is: why did only 40 companies so file?

The answer is that there are likely a number of different reasons, and our Deputy Chief Accountant Julie Erhardt discussed the possibilities in a speech she gave at the AICPA conference last December. I want to focus on just one of the reasons here, which is that, in many cases, financial statements prepared in accordance with home country adaptation of IFRS did not also contain a reference by both the company and its auditor that the financial statements also complied with IFRS in the form issued by the IASB. Indeed, the roadmap contemplated that we would see filings of financial statements prepared using IFRS as promulgated by the IASB. However, various jurisdictions have not accepted IFRS exactly as promulgated by the IASB, and have instead made various changes thereto. Consequently, as Julie noted, we have seen filings containing financial statements based upon national jurisdictional adaptations of IFRS. In and of themselves, these financial statements certainly fit within the SEC's filing requirements, but without the reference to IFRS as promulgated by the IASB, they do not appear to be financial statements that fit under the one set of global accounting standards that we wrote about in the roadmap.

Now, we certainly understand why a jurisdiction may wish to adopt its own version of IFRS. However, one goal of the roadmap was to allow the elimination of the reconciliation requirement, and as a consequence, have two versions of robust standards developed by independent standard setters in the U.S. capital markets, not thirty different versions. The question then occurs: how do we reach the 'critical mass' – to use a term from the roadmap – of filers using IFRS as promulgated by the IASB? What will happen this year – year two of the roadmap? While the answer is not clear at this time, I think that serious discussion by issuers with their auditors may be necessary. I am hopeful that auditors could prepare opinions stating that the audited financial statements were prepared according to IFRS as promulgated by the IASB, and not solely the 'Jurisdiction X IFRS'. In any event, we need to get to the bottom of this issue, and see more companies filing audited financial statements in the manner contemplated by the roadmap. My bottom line, though, is that the roadmap is going well overall and that we will achieve our objectives.

Click for Full Text (PDF 73k).

IFRIC (International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee) (blue) Image

Notes from the March 2007 IFRIC meeting days 2 and 3

10 Mar 2007

The International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) met at the IASB's offices in London on Thursday and Friday 8-9 March 2007. Also, on the afternoon of Wednesday 7 March 2007, a meeting was held, for those IFRIC members wishing to attend, to discuss the drafting of future recommendations for the IFRIC agenda.

This meeting replaced the former IFRIC Agenda Committee. Presented below are the preliminary and unofficial notes taken by Deloitte observers at the meeting on 8 and 9 March.

Notes from the IFRIC Meeting -- 8-9 March 2007

Thursday 8 March 2007

  D20 Customer Loyalty Programmes

The IFRIC continued their redeliberations of the proposed Interpretation in light of comments received during the exposure of Draft IFRIC Interpretation D20 Customer Loyalty Programmes.

Allocation of consideration

D20 paragraph 6 proposed that the fair value of the consideration received or receivable should be allocated to the identifiable components of the sale transaction with reference to the relative fair values of the components. Several commentators objected to the proposal. Some thought that the IFRIC was being too restrictive in an area in which IAS 18 permitted different methods; others thought that other allocation methods could produce more relevant information; and others were concerned that the restriction could be applied by analogy to situations in which such an approach was inappropriate.

The IFRIC discussed this issue at length. They were sympathetic to the argument that to restrict the allocation method was perhaps not ideal, but they were almost unanimous in opposing permitting the use of a residual value method in which the residual fair value was equated with the residual (marginal) cost of providing future services, which many saw as an invitation to avoid recognising the obligation at all. The aim of the allocation was to determine the fair value of the remaining performance obligation. The IFRIC seemed receptive to an approach that would permit an entity to perform the allocation of fair value either on the basis of measuring the fair value of what has been delivered or what remains to be delivered, provided that an entity measured the fair value of the relevant goods or services, not their cost of delivery.

The staff was asked to consider the IFRIC's views and present revised proposals at a subsequent meeting.

Whether fair value will be reliable

The IFRIC agreed that the fact that there will be cases where no market price will readily be observable for the goods and services granted within loyalty programmes does not justify the use of alternative methods not based on the fair value of the rights.

Proposed guidance

Positioning

The IFRIC agreed that the guidance in D20 paragraph 7 should be retained but that it should be moved to a separate section for Implementation guidance. In addition, guidance explaining that other methods may be used should be added, for example, by utilising the arguments currently in D20 paragraph BC10. Discounting The IFRIC noted that D20 paragraph 7 was confused and confusing. 'Discount' was used to mean a reduction of the price that would otherwise apply, rather than in a financing context. When combined with the comment about the 'time value of money' in paragraph 7(c), it was understandable that commentators were confused about what the IFRIC intended. The problems were even more acute when the English was translated into other languages. The IFRIC agreed that there should be no specific reference to the time value of money and that D20 paragraph 7 should be redrafted to clarify its meaning.

The staff was asked to present revised proposals at a subsequent meeting.

Expected forfeiture rate

The IFRIC agreed to retain the guidance in D20 that the fair value of the award credits should take into account expectations regarding forfeiture rates. However, material would be added to the Basis to emphasise that the method used in IFRS 2 Share-based Payment with respect to expected forfeitures is a modified fair value method and was adopted only for practical purposes in that Standard and should not be applied by analogy to customer loyalty schemes.

The staff was asked to consider preparing an illustrative example of this issue.

Revenue recognition

The need for guidance in the Interpretation

The IFRIC agreed that guidance on revenue recognition similar to that in D20 paragraph 8 should be included in the Interpretation.

The IFRIC saw no inconsistency between the requirements proposed in the Consensus and the objectives set out in the Basis for Conclusions. The IFRIC agreed that the Basis for Conclusions should include an explanation that the change in estimate of the award credits expected to be redeemed does not affect the measurement of the initial obligation, and should be recognised on a prospective basis.

Should there be Implementation Guidance?

There was general agreement that the Interpretation should include Implementation Guidance in the form of an example similar to that included in Observer Note 2(ii) paragraph 7.

Awards supplied by third parties

Revenue: gross or net

The IFRIC agreed to re-write the requirements in D20 paragraph 8 specifically to link the revenue recognition with the gross or net presentation. In doing so, the IFRIC noted that the scope of the Interpretation might need to be clarified to make it clear that loyalty schemes such as those operated by credit cards are third party award schemes within the scope of D20.

Classification of expense in gross presentation

The IFRIC agreed that the Interpretation should not address expense classification. Implementation Guidance for third party awards The IFRIC agreed that a short example illustrating revenue recognition when a third party supplies the awards should be provided.

Other issues

Customer relationship intangible assets

The IFRIC agreed to delete D20 paragraph 11 and to include a brief explanation in the Basis for Conclusions (as part of the discussion of changes made to D20). The IFRIC agreed that awards are unlikely to qualify for recognition under IAS 38 Intangible Assets and that the issue was peripheral to the Interpretation.

Transitional Arrangements

The IFRIC agreed to change the transitional provisions such that the general requirements of IAS 8 will apply.

Effective date

The IFRIC did not conclude on the effective date, but did state that it was likely that the Interpretation would be issued in time for it to be effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2008.

Other changes

The IFRIC agreed various drafting changes proposed by the staff. These drafting changes were not available to Observers.

Next steps

The staff will bring a revised draft Interpretation to the next meeting (3 and 4 May) with the intention that the IFRIC approve it at that meeting.

  IFRS 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations – Plan to Sell the Controlling Interest in a Subsidiary

The IFRIC held a preliminary but extended discussion of a potential agenda topic. The IFRIC had been asked to provide guidance on applying IFRS 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations when an entity is committed to a plan to sell the controlling interest in a subsidiary. After the sale, the entity would retain a non-controlling interest in its subsidiary, taking the form of either an investment in an associate, an interest in a joint venture or a financial asset.

The held for sale criteria

A majority of the IFRIC seemed to support the notion that committing to a plan involving loss of control over an asset or a group of assets is the triggering event for the classification as held for sale in IFRS 5. The nature of the asset represented by any non-controlling interest retained is different. If the loss of control happens in a situation in which there is not a sale that transaction was outside the scope of IFRS 5. However, other IFRIC members thought that this was not clear in the Standard and that, if the IFRIC was to agree that this was the principle, it was up to the IASB to amend the Standard.

Some IFRIC members were concerned that US GAAP would not permit sale treatment in the situation in which a significant portion of the investment was retained (for example, an associate). The SEC Observer noted that diversity in practice had been seen in US GAAP. However, an IFRIC member noted that this was a presentation issue in US GAAP-continuing involvement prevented presentation of the disposal group as a discontinued operation, but not the classification as held for sale.

It was also noted that the FASB was developing a Staff Position, FSP FAS 144-c on a related but much narrower point.

The IFRIC asked the staff to consider the various points raised in the discussion, to track developments on FSP FAS 144-c and to consider whether the issue could be resolved more efficiently through an amendment of IFRS 5. What should be classified as held for sale once the criteria are met?

The IFRIC noted that the classification issue was directly linked to the previous discussion. If loss of control is the triggering event for the purpose of IFRS 5, then the whole of the investment should be classified as held for sale. However, some IFRIC members had seen a treatment in which the portion to be retained was accounted for using the equity method from the date that the portion to be disposed of was classified as held for sale. No conclusion was reached on this issue and the staff will perform additional analysis.

Other issues

The IFRIC discussed the following issues very briefly:

  • During the held for sale period, how should the subsidiary's assets and liabilities be measured?
  • Is classification as discontinued operations relevant when the entity plans to retain a significant influence over its former subsidiary after the sale?
  • After the sale of the controlling interest, how shall the remaining investment be measured?
  • What information should be disclosed in the notes to the consolidated financial statements?

The IFRIC noted that many of these issues were inter-related and depended on the conclusions reached on the fundamental issue.

The IFRIC did not make any decision about whether the issue should be added to the agenda. The staff will present its extended analysis and recommendations at a subsequent meeting.

  IAS 18 Revenue – Sales of Real Estate

The IFRIC considered a revised draft of a Draft Interpretation addressing the decisions and suggestions made by the IFRIC at the November 2006 meeting.

Application of IAS 11 Construction Contracts and IAS 18 under the Draft Interpretation

In November IFRIC members raised concern regarding the wording in paragraph 9 of the draft Interpretation outlining under which circumstances a sale agreement would meet the definition of a construction contract and hence be within the scope of IAS 11. The IFRIC members suggested to describe a construction contract as one in which the seller provided construction services 'to the buyer's specifications' (rather than 'to the buyer's directions') but acknowledged that further guidance may be needed to clarify the meaning of this term. Two options were discussed in this context.

Option 1

Include in the Draft Interpretation examples of indicators of when a contract would be within the scope of IAS 11, including one that stated that the buyer obtains ownership rights over the work in progress as construction progresses (typically because the buyer owns the land to which the work in progress attaches). Any contract that was not within the scope of IAS 11 would be an agreement of purchase and sale and would fall within the scope of IAS 18.

Option 2

Restrict the scope of the draft Interpretation to sales of units within multiple-unit developments. In this case it would not be necessary to give a general interpretation of the term construction contract that is applicable to all real estate sales. Accordingly, the guidance on the applicable standard would be significantly simpler.

The IFRIC decided to proceed with Option 1 and there seemed to be a consensus that the indicators were helpful. Some IFRIC members were concerned about the term 'ownership' outlined in indicator noted above. They thought that this term might be problematic in some jurisdictions, particularly where buyers cannot obtain ownership of land. It appeared that the IFRIC will rephrase this indicator by addressing the question of which entity carries the risk and rewards of the asset under construction ('Whose asset is it?', 'Who has the asset under IAS 16?'). No final decision was made but the Chairman asked the IFRIC members to provide wording suggestions to the staff.

In addition, the IFRIC decided:

  • to move parts of the consensus dealing with the application of IAS 11 and IAS 18 to a separate section for application guidance.
  • that no specific transitional arrangements are included and that the standard 3-month lead in time is proposed

Revisions to example 9 in the appendix of IAS 18

The IFRIC decided to propose to supersede Example 9 in the appendix of IAS 18. Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Example 9 will be included in the draft Interpretation. The IFRIC proposes to delete paragraph 3 of Example 9 without replacement since it was considered that the paragraph does not follow from the requirements of IAS 18 itself.

  D19 IAS 19 – The Asset Ceiling: Availability of Economic Benefits and Minimum Funding Requirements

The IFRIC discussed a variety of amendments to D19 reflecting the proposals in the comment letters received. The following decisions were made with regard to the major issues (in all cases no final wording was agreed in the meeting):

Title of the Interpretation

No changes will be made to the title but the scope in paragraph 5 of D19 will be clarified. A revised wording will be considered by the staff.

Availability of an economic benefit (paragraph 7 and 8 of D19)

Some respondents noted that there are cases when the realisability of the asset is not within the control of the entity. For example, an entity may be required to make application to the trustees of the fund or a regulatory body in order to access the surplus in accordance with the rules of the fund. Some respondents inferred that, in these cases, a refund is not available.

The IFRIC had a thorough discussion on this issue and noted that availability requires the entity to have an established, unconditional right to the refund, that is, from the entity's perspective 'there has to be evidence that the asset is the Fund's'. The staff was directed to investigate this issue further, including an analysis on recognition and measurement. IFRIC members were asked to agree a revised wording with the staff offline before the May meeting.

Definition of 'contractual minimum funding requirements'

D19 will be amended to clarify that minimum funding requirements do not include contributions that are part of the benefit promise made to employees (benefit-related promises) but only contributions that are set as a requirement to fund that promise.

In addition, it will be clarified that only the minimum funding requirements that give rise to statutory or contractual contribution obligations are within the scope of the Interpretation.

Clarification of the use of the term 'substantive enactment'

Some respondents pointed out that the term substantive enactment is normally applied to statutory obligations only and not to contractual obligations and that the requirement for substantive enactment should apply to the economic benefits available as a refund as well as a future contribution reduction.

A sentence similar to that in paragraph 14 will be added to paragraph 7 of D19 outlining that no allowance shall be made for expected changes in the terms and conditions of the minimum funding requirement that are not substantively enacted at the balance sheet date or not yet contractually agreed.

Time value of money

Paragraph 11 of D19 will be amended to clarify that 'in the rare cases, when the refund is a fixed nominal (or absolute) amount to be paid in the future, the entity shall make an allowance for the time value of money using IAS 19 assumptions.'

Reduction in future contributions

Future demographic changes (paragraph 15 of D19)

Some respondents noted that calculating service costs for future periods requires assumptions that are not required in the calculation of the defined benefit obligation (DBO). In particular, the assumptions underlying the present value of the DBO calculation do not include an explicit assumption for new entrants. Other respondents noted that the assumption in respect of future new entrants can have a significant effect and would, in particular, seem reasonable when there is an expectation of a declining membership. In such a case this should be incorporated in the calculation of the asset available as a reduction in future contributions.

The IFRIC had a thorough discussion on this issue and mixed views were expressed. It appeared that a majority does not want to take future reductions into account but that the assumptions should be same for both the calculation of service costs for future periods and the DBO. One IFRIC member noted that planned reductions reflected in the entity's budgets or forecasts should be taken into consideration.

No final decision was made and the staff was asked to reconsider the current guidance in D19 to reflect the views expressed during this meeting.

Minimum funding contributions

Some respondents noted that the attribution of benefits between past and future service, as shown in Illustrative Example 3, may not be straightforward as it is possible to have a minimum funding requirement (MFR) that does not attempt to identify past and future service.

The IFRIC noted that in this case professional judgement must be applied and that no further guidance will be included in D19.

Assumptions

One respondent questioned whether the future minimum funding contributions are to be calculated using the MFR or IAS 19 assumptions.

The IFRIC pointed out that MFR contribution obligations should be determined based on the MFR assumptions rather than the IAS 19 assumptions and that the calculation of the MFR future contribution obligation should incorporate the expected MFR funding level. All other amounts used in applying the Interpretation should be derived using IAS 19 assumptions. It appeared that no further guidance would be included with regard to this issue.

Term of the calculation

Some respondents questioned what treatment is required when the expected life of the plan is greater than the expected life of the entity. An amendment will be made to clarify that the economic benefit available as a future contribution reduction should be calculated over the expected life of the plan or the expected life of the entity, whichever is the shorter.

Liability recognition and consistency with the framework

Some respondents disagreed with, or asked for further clarification of the rationale for, the requirement to adjust the defined benefit asset or liability before the contribution is paid into the plan (paragraph 18 of D19). The IFRIC noted that there is no inconsistency with the framework. It appeared that the increase in the net defined benefit liability is considered to be a liability in accordance with IAS 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets. A fuller explanation of the rationale for the approach will be included in the Basis for Conclusions.

Illustrative examples

The Illustrative Examples will be amended to clarify that contributions payable are not recognised on the balance sheet unless they would be unavailable after they are paid. In addition an arithmetical error will be corrected.

Transition requirements

The Interpretation will require application from the beginning of the first period presented, that is, no full respective application.

The staff was directed to present a revised Draft Interpretation at the May 2007 meeting.

  IAS 38 Intangible Assets – Advertising and Promotional Expenditure and Catalogues

Amendments to IAS 38

At its meeting in January 2007 the IFRIC decided not to develop an Interpretation on this issue but to propose amendments to paragraph 70 of IAS 38 to remove the incompatibility of language between IAS 38.69 and 70. The IFRIC decided to also include future training activities.

The proposed amendment states that paragraph 68 of IAS 38 does not preclude recognising as an asset prepayments made for future training or advertising and promotional activities until those activities take place. It seemed that the term 'take place' was not finally agreed but that the staff should investigate whether there are other generic terms that meet the objective in a better way. There seemed to be a consensus to include additional guidance to clarify when the activities in question have 'taken place', for example, first distribution of advertising.

Consequential amendments to SIC 32

The IFRIC agreed to proposed consequential amendments to SIC 32 Intangible Assets – Web Site Costs. The current version of SIC 32 requires expenses to be recognised when incurred. The term incurred will be replaced by something like 'when the website is first made available to the public'.

The staff was asked to redraft the amendments accordingly for approval at a future meeting. The IFRIC intends to present the amendments to the Board for inclusion in the Annual Improvement Process which is intended to be issued on 1 October 2007 effective for periods beginning 1 January 2009.

Friday 9 March 2007

  IAS 21 Foreign Exchange: Hedging a Net Investment in a Foreign Operation

The IFRIC continued their discussion of the accounting for a hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation (See January 2007 IASPlus Report). The discussion at this meeting concentrated on two main issues: (1) where within a group can the hedging instrument be held; and (2) which net investment risk is eligible to be hedged?

Where can the hedging instrument be held?

The IFRIC agreed that a hedging instrument can be held by any entity within the group, provided that the instrument is considered effective, that is, the functional currency of the net investment and the functional currency of the parent are the same currencies as those on which the hedging instrument's value is based.

Which risk is eligible to be hedged?

There was no interest among IFRIC for adopting the restrictions in US GAAP, which states that an entity can only hedge its direct exposure to a net investment in a foreign operation. Instead, the IFRIC thought that the accounting should reflect economic reality. The IFRIC concluded that, at the consolidated level, the hedgeable risk created by a net investment could be any risk between the net investment in a foreign operation and any immediate, intermediate or ultimate parent in the chain. This is commonly called the 'bottom up approach'.

There was some discussion about how best to communicate IFRIC's consensus, whether an Interpretation should be issued or through developing Implementation Guidance for IAS 21. The staff was asked to return at the next meeting with a recommendation.

  Review of Tentative Agenda Decisions Published in January 2007 IFRIC Update

  • IAS 17 Leases – Sale and leasebacks with repurchase agreements

The IFRIC confirmed their tentative decision not to take this item to the Agenda. A final Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  • IAS 19 Employee Benefits – Special wage tax

The IFRIC confirmed their tentative decision not to take this item to the Agenda. A final Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  • IAS 36 Impairment of Assets – Identifying cash generating units in the retail industry

The IFRIC confirmed their tentative decision not to take this item to the Agenda. A final Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  • IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement – Written options in retail energy contracts

The IFRIC confirmed their tentative decision not to take this item to the Agenda. However, several IFRIC members noted that the wording of the Tentative Agenda Decision was cryptic and was not useful in its current form. Some suggested that an explanation as to why many retail arrangements would not meet the 'ability to settle net' would not be met (and were therefore not within the scope f IAS 39) should be added. Others thought that to expand the Agenda Decision at all would stray into Interpretation territory.

IFRIC seemed to agree that the final Agenda Decision would state that the contract being assessed would have to be capable of being settled on a net basis. The final Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  • IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement – Assessing hedge effectiveness of an interest rate swap in a cash flow hedge

The IFRIC confirmed their tentative decision not to take this item to the Agenda. A final Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  Staff Recommendations for Tentative Agenda Decisions

  • IFRS 3 – Reassessments in a business combination

The IFRIC tentatively decided not to provide guidance on whether, and in what circumstances, a business combination triggers a reassessment of the acquiree's classification or designation of assets, liabilities and contracts acquired or assumed in a business combination. A Tentative Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update. IFRIC members asked that the staff provided both financial instrument and non-financial instrument (for example, whether to reassess the classification of a lease) examples in the Tentative Agenda Decision.

  • IAS 1 and IAS 39 – Current or non-current presentation of derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments in effective hedges

The IFRIC discussed a tension/inconsistency between IAS 39 and the balance sheet presentation requirements in IAS 1. IAS 39 paragraph 9 requires derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments under IAS 39 to be classified as held for trading and be measured at fair value through profit or loss. IAS 1 requires an item to be classified as current if it is 'held primarily for the purpose of being traded'. It was noted that some constituents are reading these two paragraphs to imply that, because a derivative is classified as held for trading for the purposes of IAS 39, it must be a current asset. (The IFRIC observed that the classification in IAS 39 drives the measurement of the instrument and is not intended to affect presentation.) It was noted that derivatives are often held to hedge long-term positions (for example, interest rate swaps on long-term debt) and that current classification is not sensible nor does it reflect economic substance.

The IFRIC tentatively decided not to provide guidance on whether derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments under IAS 39 should be presented as current or non-current on the face of the balance sheet. Such derivatives may be settled more than one year after the balance sheet date. The IFRIC agreed to ask the Board to clarify IAS 1 such that the internal conflict highlighted by this issue is resolved. A Tentative Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  • IAS 16 – Sale of assets held for rental

The IFRIC considered a request to provide guidance on the treatment of sales of assets held for rental. As part of their business, companies such as motor vehicle dealerships, with a rental division, regularly purchase assets (vehicles in this case) and hold these assets for rental to third parties. Many of these entities are in fact in the business of selling these assets, as well as renting them. This dual intention is part of their business model, sales of such assets may occur on a regular basis and the renting and selling activities may be undertaken by separate divisions.

The IFRIC noted that the issues in the submission were beyond the scope of an interpretation. They included both matters of presentation and classification as well as recognition and measurement. As such, the issue was much better addressed by the Board.

The IFRIC tentatively decided not to take this issue to the Agenda. Rather, they will refer the issue to the Board for consideration. A Tentative Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

  • IAS 19 – Curtailments and negative past service cost

The IFRIC considered a request to interpret IAS 19 to distinguish between curtailments and negative past service costs. In IAS 19, plan amendments that reduce existing benefits may fall within the definition of either curtailments or negative past service cost. The ambiguity in the definitions means that entities can, in effect, choose how to treat those plan amendments. When curtailments occur, they are recognised immediately, together with any related actuarial gains and losses that had not previously been recognised. Negative past service costs are recognised over the remaining service lives of the employees.

The IFRIC tentatively decided not to take this issue to the Agenda. Rather, they will refer the issue to the Board asking that it be considered as part of its ongoing projects related to employee benefits. A Tentative Agenda Decision will be published in the March 2007 issue of IFRIC Update.

Scroll down for notes from day 1 of the IFRIC meeting.

This summary is based on notes taken by observers at the IFRIC meeting and should not be regarded as an official or final summary.

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Agenda for March 2007 IASB meeting

09 Mar 2007

The International Accounting Standards Board will hold its March 2007 Board meeting at its offices, 30 Cannon Street, London, on Tuesday through Thursday 20-22 March 2007. Presented below is the agenda for the meeting. 20-22 March 2007, London Tuesday 20 March 2007 (afternoon only) Liabilities – amendments to IAS 37 How to distinguish between a liability and a business risk Post-employment Benefits – Preliminary Views Presentation alternatives for changes in defined benefit obligations and the value of plan assets. Wednesday 21 March 2007 Financial Instruments – Due process document Annual Improvements Process: Should the references to segment reporting in IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement be removed? Should the perceived inconsistency in the definition of 'recoverable amount' in IAS 16 be removed? Should IAS 40 be amended to clarify how to arrive at the carrying amount of an investment property held under a lease? Should the reference to recognising contingent liabilities in IAS 19 Employee Benefits be removed? Should the term 'fall due' in the definition of short-term employee benefits be replaced to remove the perceived conflict with the term 'expected to occur' used in the description of compensated absences? How should issues that could be resolved either as editorial corrections or by the annual improvements process be dealt with? Restructure of IFRS 1 (discussion continued from February meeting) Technical Plan Business Combinations Phase 2 – Redeliberations of proposed revisions to IFRS 3 Business Combinations measurement of non-controlling interests and accounting for acquisitions and dispositions of non-controlling interests after control has been obtained; accounting for contingent consideration in a business combination; accounting for bargain purchases; accounting for the loss of control of a business as a result of a non-reciprocal transfer to owners; accounting for an assembled workforce acquired in a business combination; and valuation allowance disclosures. Thursday 22 March 2007 Financial Statement Presentation Application of the measurement working principle (including presentation of information about remeasurements) Presentation of other comprehensive income items Definition of cash equivalents and the presentation of cash and cash equivalents Conceptual Framework Measurement roundtables summary Plan for using Measurement roundtables comments IFRIC Update Earnings per Share Proposed 'fair value' method for dilutive instruments Scoping issues related to the convergence project Leases Discussion of simple lease contract Summary of recent Joint Leasing Working Group meeting. .

The International Accounting Standards Board will hold its March 2007 Board meeting at its offices, 30 Cannon Street, London, on Tuesday through Thursday 20-22 March 2007. Presented below is the agenda for the meeting.

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20-22 March 2007, London

Tuesday 20 March 2007 (afternoon only)

  • Liabilities – amendments to IAS 37 How to distinguish between a liability and a business risk
  • Post-employment Benefits – Preliminary Views Presentation alternatives for changes in defined benefit obligations and the value of plan assets.
Wednesday 21 March 2007
  • Financial Instruments – Due process document
  • Annual Improvements Process:
    • Should the references to segment reporting in IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement be removed?
    • Should the perceived inconsistency in the definition of 'recoverable amount' in IAS 16 be removed?
    • Should IAS 40 be amended to clarify how to arrive at the carrying amount of an investment property held under a lease?
    • Should the reference to recognising contingent liabilities in IAS 19 Employee Benefits be removed?
    • Should the term 'fall due' in the definition of short-term employee benefits be replaced to remove the perceived conflict with the term 'expected to occur' used in the description of compensated absences?
    • How should issues that could be resolved either as editorial corrections or by the annual improvements process be dealt with?
    • Restructure of IFRS 1 (discussion continued from February meeting)
  • Technical Plan
  • Business Combinations Phase 2 – Redeliberations of proposed revisions to IFRS 3 Business Combinations
    • measurement of non-controlling interests and accounting for acquisitions and dispositions of non-controlling interests after control has been obtained;
    • accounting for contingent consideration in a business combination;
    • accounting for bargain purchases;
    • accounting for the loss of control of a business as a result of a non-reciprocal transfer to owners;
    • accounting for an assembled workforce acquired in a business combination; and
    • valuation allowance disclosures.
Thursday 22 March 2007
  • Financial Statement Presentation
    • Application of the measurement working principle (including presentation of information about remeasurements)
    • Presentation of other comprehensive income items
    • Definition of cash equivalents and the presentation of cash and cash equivalents
  • Conceptual Framework
    • Measurement roundtables summary
    • Plan for using Measurement roundtables comments
  • IFRIC Update
  • Earnings per Share
    • Proposed 'fair value' method for dilutive instruments
    • Scoping issues related to the convergence project
  • Leases
    • Discussion of simple lease contract
    • Summary of recent Joint Leasing Working Group meeting.
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Notes from the March 2007 IFRIC meeting day 1

09 Mar 2007

The International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) is meeting at the IASB's offices in London on Thursday and Friday 8-9 March 2007. Also, on the afternoon of Wednesday 7 March 2007, a meeting was held, for those IFRIC members wishing to attend, to discuss the drafting of future recommendations for the IFRIC agenda.

This meeting replaced the former IFRIC Agenda Committee. The purpose of the meeting was to expedite the business of the IFRIC by assisting the staff to identify and analyse the issues arising in practice. Presented below are the preliminary and unofficial notes taken by Deloitte observers at the meeting on 7 March.

Notes from the IFRIC Meeting -- 7 March 2007

  Preliminary Discussion of IFRIC Issues

In his opening remarks, the IFRIC Chairman noted that this session was the first public, non-executive session of what was used to be the Agenda Committee. The purpose of these sessions had not changed: it is to give the IASB staff an opportunity to discuss with IFRIC members potential agenda items prior to the staff making a formal recommendation to the IFRIC about whether a topic should be added to the IFRIC's Agenda. Accordingly, there was no requirement for a quorum and neither technical decisions nor agenda decisions can be made.

The Chairman pointed out that the observer notes provided to the public merely contained brief descriptions of the issues submitted since all documents prepared by the staff contain preliminary views that have not been approved.

IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement – Hedging future cash flows with purchased options

The IFRIC received submissions regarding a purchased option in its entirety being designated as a hedging instrument to hedge variability in future cash flows. The submissions suggest using a hypothetical derivative approach in assessing and measuring hedge effectiveness. That approach requires an entity to take into account the time value of the option when it determines changes in the fair value of the hedged item in assessing and measuring hedge effectiveness. The submission asks for guidance on whether the approach is allowed under IAS 39.

It appeared from the discussion that the IFRIC members acknowledged that the issue is widespread and that diversity in practice exists. It seems likely that the IFRIC would want to focus on the type of instrument at inception of the hedge rather than on the type of the hedged risk. The staff was directed to investigate this issue further in close co-operation with the Board's staff working on the Financial Instruments project.

IAS 18 Revenue – Customer contributions

The IFRIC received a submission that asked for guidance on how a government or private sector utility company should account for customer contributions. Such contributions arise when the entity enters into an arrangement with a customer such that the customer has to provide either an infrastructure asset or cash to fund the acquisition and/or construction of such an asset in order to obtain connection to the utility company's network. The contributed infrastructure asset is necessary for the utility entity to provide an ongoing utility service to the customer but does not have a direct impact on the rates the utility company charges its customer.

Some IFRIC members stated that the issue was widespread and that diversity in practice has occurred. There seemed to be a consensus that the first step in this project should be to identify what kind of asset the contribution represents and how this asset should be measured ('what is the debit?'). The second step should be to consider how income arising from the contribution, if any, should be recognised. One IFRIC member noted that the scope might be too broad for an IFRIC project but that further investigations are likely to result in useful insights on accounting for exchange transactions.

The staff was directed to provide a revised paper for discussion at a future meeting.

IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement – Hedging multiple risks with a single derivative hedging instrument

The IFRIC received a submission about using a single derivative hedging instrument to hedge more than one type of risk. The submission asks for guidance on whether IAS 39 allows an entity to impute notional cash flows to split the fair value of the derivative hedging instrument into multiple components for the purposes of assessing and measuring hedge effectiveness.

It appeared from the discussion that the IFRIC members acknowledged that the issue is widespread and that diversity in practice exists. Two IFRIC members noted that they tend to allow notional legs.

The staff was directed to provide a revised paper for discussion at a future meeting.

IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement – Scope of IAS 39 paragraph 11A

The IFRIC received a submission asking for guidance on whether IAS 39 paragraph 11A can be applied to all contractual arrangements that contain one or more embedded derivatives, particularly whether paragraph 11A can be applied to hybrid contracts that contain financial or non-financial hosts outside the scope of IAS 39.

Many of the IFRIC members stated that the issue is widespread and that diversity in practice has occurred. There seemed to be a consensus that paragraph 11A of IAS 39 can be applied to hybrid contracts that contain hosts within the scope of IAS 39. It was noted that otherwise paragraph 11A would have the character of a general rule that allows all kinds of contracts to be accounted for at fair value through profit and loss. In addition, some IFRIC members noted that paragraph 11A can also not be applied by analogy in connection with the 'GAAP hierarchy' in paragraphs 10-12 of IAS 8.

Some IFRIC members noted that an Interpretation might not be necessary and that an Agenda Decision could resolve the issue.

The staff was directed to prepare a revised paper for discussion at a future meeting.

IAS 18 Revenue – Gaming transactions

The IFRIC received a request for guidance on how a gaming institution should account for bets or wagers received. The question focussed on whether such transactions give rise to revenue or whether unsettled wagers are financial instruments that should be accounted for using IAS 39.

IFRIC members seemed to agree that any project it undertook should only address situations in which the gaming institution takes a position against that of the customer, that is, situations in which the gaming institution acts as an agent should be scoped out.

Some IFRIC members noted that there is a consistent practice to treat outstanding wagers as financial instruments under IAS 39. However, it was assumed that diversity in practice exists regarding the presentation in the income statement, in particular, gross or net presentation of income (revenue/gain).

The staff was directed to analyse the accounting treatments currently applied by gaming institutions and to identify the areas in which diversity has occurred.

This summary is based on notes taken by observers at the IFRIC meeting and should not be regarded as an official or final summary.

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Updates of Asia-Pacific region pages

09 Mar 2007

We have updated the following pages on this website to reflect recent standard setting activity in the Asia-Pacific region: Australia, Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Singapore, and Thailand.

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EC Roundtable for the Consistent Application of IFRSs

09 Mar 2007

The European Commission has posted the summary of discussions at the 26 January 2007 meeting of the EC Roundtable for the Consistent Application of IFRSs.

The purpose of the Roundtable, which was formed in 2006, is to identify cases where the accounting treatment in Europe under IFRSs is so divergent, significant, and widespread as to warrant 'common concern' among the different groups of participants (preparers, auditors, national standard setters, regulators). When such issues of common concern are identified, the Roundtable generally recommends referring them to IFRIC, though circumstances could also arise where the matter should be addressed directly to the IASB Board. The Roundtable itself will not make any interpretations. We have a Roundtable Web Page. At the 26 January 2007 meeting, the Roundtable discussed six new issues. Two of those will be developed into Technical Papers for a further discussion at the next meeting. The two issues are:
  • Regulatory Assets and Liabilities
  • IAS 17 Leases – exercise of renewal/extension options
The Roundtable also discussed a Paper on the Treatment of IFRIC Rejections (PDF 29k). The Roundtable also noted that the US Securities and Exchange Commission is requiring SEC registrants who file on the basis of 'IFRSs as Adopted by the EU' to provide a reconciliation from 'IFRSs as Adopted...' to full IFRSs, as well as to US GAAP. Click for Report of 26 January 2007 Roundtable Meeting (PDF 25k).

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